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Posts for tag: plantar fasciitis

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
January 24, 2018

There are many sources of ankle pain due to the complex array of tendons, ligaments, tissues, and bones in the foot that are susceptible to painful and debilitating injury. The area of pain can radiate from the inside to the outside of the ankle, or along the Achilles tendon, where your lower leg and calf muscles connect to your heel bone.

Some of the most common ankle problems that cause pain include the following:

Even a seemingly minor ankle injury can bring on severe pain, swelling, redness, and stiffness.

Home remedies and treatment for ankle pain mainly consist of the RICE method:

  • Rest—It is very important to take the weight off of the ankle.
  • Ice—Apply an ice pack several times a day for 15-20 minutes.
  • Compression—Wrap the ankle with a compression bandage to help reduce swelling.
  • Elevation—Raising your foot above the level of your heart also reduces swelling.

Pain medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen sodium can reduce discomfort and inflammation. In cases of fractures or other major problems, surgery may be necessary.

If your pain and discomfort are not alleviated after a couple of weeks, or if the swelling remains severe after several days, it may be a sign of a more difficult problem requiring the expertise of a foot care specialist to determine the precise cause of the pain and to make the best recommendations for treatment. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
January 16, 2018
Category: Proper Footwear
Tags: Bunions   plantar fasciitis  

More women are choosing to forego the wearing of high heeled shoes as sales of the constricting and uncomfortable footwear continue a fast decline in favor of flats and other comfort wear. The trend is being fueled by high profile celebrities like Oprah Winfrey who have decided they don’t want to sacrifice their health in pursuit of dubious high fashion. While some women continue to wear heels at work or for special occasions, the major shift in the workplace is to more comfortable shoes and clothing.

Forcing your feet into high heels on a regular basis exacerbates a long list of foot and ankle problems, including:

  • Plantar fasciitis—An inflammation of the band of tissue that runs across the foot bottom
  • Ankle injuries—Ankle pain and increased stiffness due to decreased mobility
  • Foot deformities and skin conditions—Corns, calluses, bunions, and hammertoes are more likely to occur in frequent wearers of high heels.
  • Neuromas—Morton’s neuroma is caused by the increased pressure on the ball of the foot
  • Achilles tendon issues—Shortening and stiffening of the Achilles tendon, which often can cause difficulties when you try wearing flats again

High heels also have the effect of putting the knees in a permanently bent position, causing excess stress to the knee joints and interrupting the natural movement of the foot, which has a concomitant effect on walking mechanics. Additionally, the spine can become misaligned increasing the compression forces on vertebrae in the lower back. The resultant need to overuse the back muscles also adds to this layering of pain and discomfort. Medical professionals also believe that women who often wear high heels are more likely to develop osteoarthritis as they get older.

If you are experiencing foot problems caused by the wearing of high heels, your foot doctor can help. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

 

Peroneal tendonitis is a rather uncommon injury that can cause considerable pain on the outside of the foot and possibly along the outer area of the lower leg. Since this malady can be misdiagnosed by general doctors as plantar fasciitis, it is very important to see a foot care specialist to receive the correct diagnosis and care.

There are two peroneal ligaments, the peroneus longus and the peroneus brevis which form parallel to each other on the outside of the foot. These eventually join with the corresponding muscles of the lower leg. These two tendons work concomitantly to roll your foot outwards and they also assist your calf muscles in flexing the plantar fascia, which runs along the bottom of your foot. These tendons also add to ankle stability during weight-bearing exercises.

The symptoms of peroneal tendonitis include:

  • Tenderness and pain along one or both tendons on the outside of the foot
  • Pain while doing exercises such as running
  • Soreness and stiffness when you roll your foot outwards or during passive stretching

Although you may be feeling extreme pain from this injury, peroneal tendonitis generally responds very well to physical therapy and home treatments, with surgery rarely being required.

Treatment options may include the following:

  • Rest for the affected foot
  • Stretching of the calf muscles
  • Strengthening and flexibility exercises
  • Balancing exercises
  • Icing and contrast baths
  • Ultrasound
  • Whirlpool and paraffin baths
  • Custom fitted orthotic shoe inserts

Should your tendons not favorably respond to rest and physical therapy exercises after a few weeks, an orthotic insert may be needed. The use of standard over-the-counter inserts is not recommended for this particular injury since they shift the stress to the outside of the foot, in the area of the sore tendons.

An X-ray will be taken of the foot and your doctor may recommend an MRI to rule out any major problems such as severe tendon damage. A custom orthopedic shoe insert can then be used with the emphasis being to shift the stress away from the injured tendons.

For peroneal tendonitis or any other problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles, the podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
December 29, 2017

A heel spur is a small, bony growth that extends from the bottom of the heel bone. It is formed over many months from the deposit of calcium and is often associated with another condition called plantar fasciitis. These conditions are created by excess stress and strain to the tendons and ligaments of the foot and are frequently seen in athletes who do a lot of running and jumping with quick starts and stops. A heel spur may not always be painful, but the protrusion can sometimes extend out a half an inch.

Other contributing factors to developing heel spurs include:

Poorly fitting shoes—Proper arch support is essential to avoiding some of the tendon and ligament stress and damage that can lead to the growth of a heel spur. Always have your feet measured when getting new footwear, and make sure you know your foot type to know what kind of arch support to use. This is also extremely important to address the possible gait abnormalities that can put excessive pressure on the heel.

Aging and weight gain—As you age and possibly put on a few pounds, the flexibility of the plantar fascia lessens and the protective layer of fat on the heel diminishes, increasing the occurrence of heel spurs.

Treatment for heel spurs includes:

Heel spurs will often respond well to conservative measures including properly fitted shoes with extra cushioning in the heel area; physical therapy to increase strength and to relax the inflamed tissue; corticosteroid injections; and custom fitted orthotics for stabilization and additional heel cushioning.

If you are experiencing heel pain, the podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be having with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
December 19, 2017
Category: Proper Footwear

Keeping your feet in good shape is a lot easier when you make sure you have properly fitted shoes. The materials the shoe is composed of, the shape of the shoe, the arch support, and the soles are all very important considerations when it comes to foot health in leisure, sport, and work activities.

Two essential tips for choosing the right shoes that will keep your feet happy include the following:

The correct size—This may seem obvious, but many people underestimate the amount of change their feet can go through in a year. Your feet swell and flatten out as you get older, and you may find the size changes quite dramatically from one year to the next. Always shop for shoes towards the end of the day when your feet are fully expanded, and make sure to have them both measured and move up a half size if necessary.

Good support—Your shoes need to provide good arch and ball of foot support. Your arch is one of the most important components of your foot health, so be sure to have your arch type properly determined. Make sure you include any necessary orthotic inserts to correct gait abnormalities. The ball of the foot needs to be supported as well to prevent problems with the forefoot. Sturdy soles are also essential to good foot support. Tears in the arch ligaments from poor foot support can result in debilitating conditions such as plantar fasciitis.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.