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Posts for tag: heel pain

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
December 10, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: heel pain  

How your podiatrists in Manhattan, New York can help with your heel pain

Heel PainHeel pain isn’t just annoying—it can also be debilitating if it keeps you from standing, walking, or even putting weight on your feet. The first step to treating your heel pain is to find out what is causing it. For an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of heel pain, it’s best to visit the experts. Drs. Sorelis Jimenez and John W. Fletcher at Foot Health Podiatry in Manhattan, New York can help get you back on your feet.

More about Heel Pain

One of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis, a condition that is caused by inflammation of the thick band of tissue running across your heel. This band of tissue, called the plantar fascia, can become inflamed from overpronating (rolling your feet when you walk) or from standing and walking on hard surfaces for long periods of time. You also may be at greater risk of plantar fasciitis if you are a runner, are flat-footed, or are overweight.

If your heel pain is caused by plantar fasciitis, you can try palliative treatments like icing your heel, taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory pain medications, and taking weight off of your feet. For moderate to severe plantar fasciitis pain, your podiatrist may recommend custom-fit orthotics, extracorporeal shock wave treatment, physical therapy, and prescription medications to reduce inflammation.

You may also experience pain from a heel bruise caused by stepping on sharp objects, or a heel spur due to excess calcium deposits. You can do a lot to prevent heel injuries by always wearing supportive, comfortable shoes. If you are active, always wear footwear that is appropriate for the activity you are doing.

Palliative treatments like icing and taking over-the-counter medications like Tylenol or ibuprofen can help with heel pain due to trauma. Your podiatrist can provide professional services including custom-fit orthotics, heel wedges, and other supports to cushion your heels.

Call Today!

You can get relief from heel pain by contacting your podiatrists, Drs. Sorelis Jimenez and John W. Fletcher at Foot Health Podiatry in Manhattan, New York! Call (212) 845-9991 today!

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
December 29, 2017

A heel spur is a small, bony growth that extends from the bottom of the heel bone. It is formed over many months from the deposit of calcium and is often associated with another condition called plantar fasciitis. These conditions are created by excess stress and strain to the tendons and ligaments of the foot and are frequently seen in athletes who do a lot of running and jumping with quick starts and stops. A heel spur may not always be painful, but the protrusion can sometimes extend out a half an inch.

Other contributing factors to developing heel spurs include:

Poorly fitting shoes—Proper arch support is essential to avoiding some of the tendon and ligament stress and damage that can lead to the growth of a heel spur. Always have your feet measured when getting new footwear, and make sure you know your foot type to know what kind of arch support to use. This is also extremely important to address the possible gait abnormalities that can put excessive pressure on the heel.

Aging and weight gain—As you age and possibly put on a few pounds, the flexibility of the plantar fascia lessens and the protective layer of fat on the heel diminishes, increasing the occurrence of heel spurs.

Treatment for heel spurs includes:

Heel spurs will often respond well to conservative measures including properly fitted shoes with extra cushioning in the heel area; physical therapy to increase strength and to relax the inflamed tissue; corticosteroid injections; and custom fitted orthotics for stabilization and additional heel cushioning.

If you are experiencing heel pain, the podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be having with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
September 19, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: heel pain  

Has your heel suddenly started hurting and you don't know why? Our Manhattan and Amsterdam, NY, podiatrists - Dr. Sorelis Jimenez, Dr. heel painJohn Fletcher and Dr. Kamilla Danilova - discuss common causes of heel pain and explain treatment options that will help you get back on your feet.

Your exercise routine

Exercising regularly is an excellent way to stay in shape and improve your health, but it's not without risks. If you haven't exercised for a while and push yourself too hard, you can injure your heels and feet. Pain can also occur if you decide to increase the length or intensity of your usual exercise routine. Overuse injuries can cause plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the band of connective tissue that runs underneath your feet or other inflammatory conditions, including retrocalcaneal bursitis and Achilles tendinitis.

Your job

Teachers, nurses, factory workers, retail clerks and other people who rarely get the chance to sit down during the workday are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis. The condition causes heel pain that's worse in the morning and increases if you've been on your feet for a long time.

Your age

Although your feet may look exactly the same as they did when you were younger, aging also affects them. You're more likely to develop plantar fasciitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, Achilles tendinitis or arthritis the older you get.

The shoes you wear

Your running shoes may look perfectly fine after months of use, but appearances can be deceiving. Over time, the material in the sole can compress. When that happens, the shoes no longer cushion and support your foot effectively, putting you at risk for developing common heel conditions.

Your gait

Gait issues can increase your risk of heel pain. For example, if your feet roll inward when you walk, you may be more likely to develop plantar fasciitis. Gait issues may also be responsible for painful plantar calluses on the bottom of your heel.

What can I do about heel pain?

Often rest, ice, over-the-counter pain medications and a new pair of shoes can help relieve heel pain. If your symptoms don't improve, it's a good idea to pay a visit to our Manhattan or Amsterdam office. Treatments vary depending on the cause of your pain. Gait issues can often be improved with orthotics, prescription shoe inserts that hold your feet in the optimum position. If your plantar fasciitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis or Achilles tendinitis pain is severe, corticosteroid injections can be helpful. Other treatment options may include boots or walking casts, night splints, physical therapy, ultrasound therapy or even surgery, in some cases.

Don't let heel pain take over your life. Call our Manhattan and Amsterdam, NY, podiatrists - Dr. Jimenez, Dr. Fletcher and Dr. Danilova - at (212) 845-9991 to make an appointment.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
August 08, 2017
Tags: Bunions   heel pain   pregnancy   tendonitis  

The natural weight gain that is experienced during pregnancy puts a lot of extra pressure on the feet, ankles, knees and back. The constriction of blood vessels leads to excess fluid retention in the feet. Pregnancy also changes your center of gravity which can cause you to alter the way you walk. This may result in excessive pronation, which is an inward rolling of the foot and flattening of the arches. Left untreated, over pronation can lead to plantar fasciitis, bunions, heel pain and tendonitis. Additional problems with your knees, hips, and back may also occur.

The swelling, or edema, that occurs in the feet and lower legs during pregnancy is caused by decreased blood circulation that can cause the blood to pool around the feet and ankles. Water retention contributes to this swelling.

Some tips for decreasing edema include the following:

  • Elevation—Take breaks often and elevate your feet above your heart. This will help your circulatory system to function more normally and reduce swelling in your feet.
  • Shoes and socks—Always wear shoes that are supportive, roomy and comfortable. When shopping for shoes, go at the end of the day when your feet have fully expanded. Wear socks that aren’t too tight.
  • Stay hydrated—Avoid eating foods with too much sodium and drink a variety of healthy beverages.
  • Travel breaks—On long trips, take rest breaks and stretch your legs frequently to increase blood circulation.

Notify your doctor right away if you experience increased swelling in your hands and face as this may be a sign of preeclampsia which is a potentially serious rise in blood pressure. If the foot pain and swelling associated with pregnancy are slowing you down, contact your foot care specialist for relief.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

 

 

 

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
July 26, 2017

If you are experiencing lower calf, ankle and heel pain, especially first thing after arising, the culprit may be an inflammation of the Achilles tendon. This is the large tendon that connects your calf muscle to the back of your heel, and when it becomes overstretched or torn from excessive pressure, the result can be a painful condition called Achilles tendonitis.

What Causes Achilles Tendonitis?

Improper warm up before exercising, and having improperly treated flat feet are two possible factors. Others may include:

  • Repetitive stress—from intense sporting activities such as tennis and soccer, and from workouts that are too aggressive. Suddenly increasing the intensity or duration of a workout can also stress this tendon.
  • Starting an exercise program too rapidly—Many injuries to the Achilles tendon are caused by working out too enthusiastically after a long period of inaction. Middle aged men tend to overestimate their abilities when starting an exercise program, so always start off slowly to avoid injury.
  • Poorly fitting shoes—Shoes with proper heel and arch support are essential to maintaining foot health. Always choose an athletic shoe that is designed for the activity and that contains the adequate amount of cushioning and support.

Treatment Recommendations:

  • RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation.)—Rest your foot and use a walking boot or crutches. Ice the area for fifteen minutes whenever painful or inflamed. Wrap the area to minimize movement and to help reduce swelling. Elevate your leg on a pillow, and overnight.
  • Pain management—Ibuprofen or other pain reliever.
  • Orthotic inserts—These in combination with properly fitted shoes can relieve the strain on the tendon and cushion the heel area.
  • Physical therapy exercises—As the tendon heals, you will need to slowly strengthen and stretch the area.

If the pain in your heel is intense enough to prevent you from walking, you may have ruptured your Achilles tendon. This type of injury may need to be surgically repaired by your foot specialist.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.