By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
September 14, 2017
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The plantar fascia is a large area of connective tissue that starts at the heel bone and runs along the bottom of your foot, through your arch, and ends at your toes. Since it supports your arch and provides significant shock absorption, the plantar fascia is particularly susceptible to injury from the repetitive stress experienced by runners, other athletes, and those who spend a lot of time on their feet every day for work.

Symptoms of plantar fasciitis:

Heel pain—One of the most common symptoms of plantar fasciitis is a pain in the heel. This can either be a sharp, stabbing sensation or dull and achy. It is usually most prevalent upon first applying weight to your foot in the morning. This discomfort and pain is likely to get worse without treatment, leading to other problems with your feet, legs, hips and back.

Bottom of the foot pain and discomfort—Pain and burning in the tissue along the bottom of the foot. The pain can get worse when climbing stairs or standing on your toes.

Exercise and occupational pain—Heel and arch pain that improves with the beginning of activity but returns at the end of activity.

Plantar fasciitis may sometimes be mistaken for or exacerbated by other conditions that have similar symptoms including arthritis and nerve problems like tarsal tunnel syndrome. Continued stress on the plantar fascia may result in the formation of a heel spur at the connection to the heel bone.

Due to the possible complications and ramifications of improper diagnosis and treatment for plantar fasciitis, it is important to see a foot care specialist for the correct care. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

 

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