By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
June 21, 2017
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When you get a big wart on the bottom of your foot it is one of the most discomforting and painful experiences, especially when the wart grows right on the ball of your foot or your heel, where a large portion of your weight lands on the wart every time you take a step, forcing it to grow into your foot and increasing the pain.

Plantar warts symptoms to look for include:

1.     A lump of hard skin usually on your heel that indicates a wart may have grown inward.

2.     Small, grainy and lumpy growth with small black dots in the middle called wart seeds. These are actually clotted blood vessels

3.     Pain and discomfort upon weight bearing right at the location of the bump on the bottom of your foot.

Treatment for plantar warts:

While not usually considered to be a major health issue, these warts can often be treated successfully with home remedies, but severe cases may require surgical removal by your foot doctor.

1.     Abrading the skin with a file and then applying an over-the-counter acid to gradually peel away layers of the wart until it subsides.

2.     Stronger prescription acids are also available through your doctor.

3.     Freezing the wart with liquid nitrogen is also an option and may be done in conjunction with acid peels.

4.     A vaccine that treats the human papillomavirus (HPV), a known cause of warts, may also destroy the warts caused by it.

To avoid getting warts it is important to avoid HPV. Always keep your feet clean and dry and wear shower shoes or sandals in public showers, locker rooms, and pool areas. If you are suffering with plantar warts make an appointment with your foot specialist.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

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