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Posts for: February, 2017

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
February 23, 2017
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Frequently seen in athletes, stress fractures (or hairline fractures) are caused by the repetitive pounding encountered during recreational and competitive sports that involve a large amount of running and jumping, such as soccer and basketball.

Conversely, a stress fracture can occur when a person who has been sedentary for a long period of time decides to suddenly start exercising. The bones just aren’t used to the increase in pressure, and are more prone to cracking. Most often, however, hairline fractures develop over time, and usually affect the weight bearing bones of the body including the lower leg bone (tibia), the long bones above the toes (metatarsals), and other bones of the foot.

The most effective method of confirming the diagnosis of a stress fracture is with an MRI scan. Once confirmed, the oftentimes arduous procedure of treatment and rehabilitation can begin.

Treating Stress Fractures

The only way to effectively heal a stress fracture is to allow the break to heal completely. A cast or walking boot may be prescribed by your foot doctor and the initial healing period can range anywhere from four to twelve or more weeks, depending upon the severity of the injury.

After this initial period of healing, you may no longer feel any pain during regular daily movements, but it is essential that you only gradually reintroduce activities such as running or playing sports because trying to do too much too fast can cause a reoccurrence.

In cases of a severe stress fracture, surgery involving the insertion of pins may be necessary, followed by a long recovery period and extensive physical therapy lasting six months or more.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, have extensive experience treating stress fractures, and are experts in providing the best care for any other problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Dr. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, Dr. John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Dr. Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.


By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
February 19, 2017
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Of all the places a wart can appear on your skin, the heel of the foot has to be one of the most potentially painful locations imaginable. This is frequently the location that a wart-causing virus (HPV) chooses to occupy, having gained entry through cracks and cuts on the soles of your feet. Human papilloma virus is very common and can be easily picked up from the gym while using the showers and locker rooms.

Plantar warts will usually resolve with good home care, but oftentimes a wart will grow underneath the skin, on the heels or balls of the feet, where the pressure causes the wart to grow inward beneath a callus. This can be particularly painful and difficult to treat and may require the assistance of a doctor to safely remove.

Signs and Symptoms of Plantar Warts

 

●Pain in the foot located under thick skin, usually on the ball or heel

●Spongy, warty, rough bumps that may contain little black pinpoints

●Warts can (and do!)  multiply, and these are amusingly known as “mosaic” warts

Home Treatment for Plantar Warts

 

●Moleskin pads to isolate the wart

●Soaking in a warm foot bath and applying salicylic acid

●Sanding with a pumice stone, and removing dead tissue

If you do not see much improvement in one to two weeks with home care methods, it may be necessary to see a foot specialist and try a more aggressive treatment such as liquid nitrogen, cauterization, or laser surgery.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, have extensive experience in removing hard to treat plantar warts, and are experts in providing the best care for any other problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Dr. Sorelis Jimenez, Dr. John W. Fletcher, Dr. Kamilla Danilova and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.


By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
February 10, 2017
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Untagged

Corns and calluses are thick layers of skin that most commonly form on your hands, feet, fingers and toes. When they appear on your feet, it is usually the result of excess friction and pressure created by poorly fitting footwear. Calluses, which tend to be larger than corns, are commonly located on the soles of the feet. They feel very rough and hardened, whereas corns are usually much smaller and typically contain a hard center surrounded by tender and inflamed skin.

In either case, the treatment options are similar and may consist of the following:

  1. As much as possible, try to stop the repetitive action that may have caused them.
  2. Avoid tight footwear that creates excessive pressure, or loose fitting shoes that cause rubbing, and irritation.
  3. Always wear socks with your shoes and sandals to decrease excess friction.
  4. Application of salicylic acid patches can be used to help dissolve the hard skin.
  5. The use of pumice stones or emery boards to help safely remove dead skin.
  6. Soaking the skin first makes these removal methods more effective.
  7. Padding and protective insoles can also provide relief.

Anyone with diabetes, foot deformities, or another health problem that causes decreased blood flow or numbness, needs to be especially careful when attempting to remove corns and calluses. It is best to consult with a podiatrist before attempting any treatment on your own to avoid any complications caused by excessive bleeding or infection. Even a simple cut can quickly turn into a serious issue.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, have extensive experience in treating corns and calluses and are experts in providing the best care for any other problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Dr. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, Dr. John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Dr. Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.