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Posts for: July, 2014

By gary @foothealthpodiatry.com
July 28, 2014
Category: Foot Conditions

There are many widely-prescribed drugs available for treating athlete’s foot fungus, but these aren’t always effective. Those who can’t shake their infection by using regular medicine may benefit from trying a less traditional approach.

For example, many people find success using vinegar to get rid of their athlete’s foot. The best way to apply it is to fill a basin with it and then soak the feet in it for a few minutes a day. If the vinegar alone is too harsh, it can be diluted with water. The pain-relief product Absorbine Jr. is also touted by many as a good way to combat recurring fungus.

Athlete’s foot is an embarrassing condition that can flare up repeatedly if not treated properly. If you need help dealing with athlete’s foot, visit podiatrist Dr. Sorelis Jiménez, DPM of Foot Health Podiatry. Dr. Jiménez can teach you how to prevent your fungus from proliferating and get you the professional care you need.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

If you suffer from itching, burning, dry, and flaking feet, this may be a sign of athlete's foot. Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be extremely contagious, and it often infects shower floors, gyms, socks and shoes, and anywhere else feet may come in contact with. It is commonly found in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools. This condition can also be prevalent in "commons" areas in prisons and residential care facilities.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

- Hydrate your feet by using lotion
- Exfoliate
- Buff off nails
- Use of anti-fungal product
- Examine feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts are present.

What is Tinea?

- Athlete’s foot is often caused by the same fungus that causes ringworm (tinea).
- Tinea can invade other parts of the body as well, if the proper thriving conditions for it are met.
- Tinea thrives in mostly dark, warm and moist environments.
- Although many people never experience athlete’s foot, around 70% of the population may suffer from tinea at some point.

For more information about Athlete’s Foot, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, please contact our office located in New York, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Athlete’s Foot


http://kuam.images.worldnow.com/images/4160284_G.jpgEddie Vilbar Vega, “the Barefoot Bandito,” is a prolific barefoot marathon runner who decided one day to use his hobby to contribute to a good cause. He partnered with Soles4Souls, a philanthropic organization designed to assist children who can’t afford to buy necessities like shoes, and pledged to break the world record for “Most Barefoot Marathons Run in One Year” to increase the amount of funds he raised for them.

Vega became the title holder for the record early in July of this year, and also became the first person to complete 50 marathons fully barefoot. His next goal is to run races without shoes in all 50 U.S. states.

Anyone can become a “Barefoot Bandito” if they work hard enough and take the right precautions. For professional help with becoming a barefoot runner, contact podiatrist Dr. Sorelis Jiménez, DPM of Foot Health Podiatry. Dr. Jiménez will guide you through the transition to shoeless running to make sure that you don’t hurt yourself in the process. 

Barefoot Running

The Impact of Barefoot Running

-Running without shoes changes the motion of your running, as most running is done by landing on the heel of the feet.
-Running barefoot requires a different way of running; the landing is done on the front part of the feet.

The Advantages of Barefoot Running

-When running and landing on the front feet, the impact on the feet and ankle is reduced, this can reduce stress injuries.
-It strengthens muscles in the feet and ankles and the lower legs.
-Balance of the body is improved and there is a greater sensory input from the feet to the rest of the body.

The Drawbacks of Barefoot Running

-No protection while running, makes it likely that runners will land on sharp objects and scrapes, bruises and cuts on the feet will result.
-Blisters may form.
-Possibility of plantar fascia problems.
-Risk of getting Achilles tendonitis.

So what can runners do to make barefoot running safe? It’s best to make a slow transition from running shoes to barefoot running. Once the feet begin to adjust, try walking, then jogging and gradually increasing the distance.

For more information about Barefoot Running, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, please contact our office located in New York, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Barefoot Running


By gary @foothealthpodiatry.com
July 14, 2014

This week, MMA fighter Uriah Hall defeated opponent Thiago Santos at UFC 175, but not without a price. Hall suffered a broken toe during the middle of the opening round. Due to being injured during the fight, Hall’s performance suffered during the fight itself.

Hall was clearly contending with a lot of pain for most of the fight, even having to briefly consult with a UFC physician during the third round. But in the end he ignored the discomfort and defeated Santos. A later medical examination eventually revealed that one of the bones in the second toe of his right foot was horrifically dislocated.

Broken toes are painful. If you injured your toe, speak to podiatrist Dr. Sorelis Jiménez, DPM of Foot Health Podiatry. Dr. Jiménez can treat your foot and ankle injuries.  

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture). Another type of trauma that can break a toe is repeated activity that places stress on the toe for prolonged periods of time.

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • throbbing pain
  • swelling
  • bruising on the skin and toenail
  • the inability to move the toe with ease.
  • toe appears crooked or disfigured
  •  tingling or numbness in the toe
  • injured person experiences fever or chills throughout their body, and when there is an open, bleeding wound present on the toe.

Generally, a minor toe break will heal without long-term complications, but it is important to discontinue activities that put pressure on the toe.

If you have any questions, please contact our office located in New York, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Broken Toes


Wendy DesbrowWendy Desbrow, 60, a citizen of Bruntingthorpe, thought it was strange when her foot began to hurt one day after doing some work around the house. Over time her discomfort grew even more pronounced, and soon she was having trouble doing any activities that involved using her feet.

Desbrow was concerned, but it was four years before she was finally able to get a proper diagnosis. It turns out that she had Morton’s neuroma, a very painful nerve condition. After getting it operated on Desbrow was able to return to her normal life, and her foot hasn’t caused her any problems since.

Morton’s neuroma can be a painfully debilitating disease, but you don’t have to live with it. If you have a neuroma in your foot that you’re seeking treatment for, consult with podiatrist Dr. Sorelis Jiménez, DPM of Foot Health Podiatry. Dr. Jiménez will get you the care you need to make a full recovery.

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the third and fourth toe and the ball of the foot, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible to this condition. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.  Women are more likely than men to have an occurrence of this foot condition. When a person has Morton's neuroma, it can feel as if they are walking on stones or marbles.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

-Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot area.
-Jogging, running and any sports that involve constant impact to the foot area.
-Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformity may put you at a higher risk for developing Morton’s neuroma.

If you suspect that you may have this condition, you should visit your podiatrist. A podiatrist will first conduct a thorough physical examination to check for palpable masses between the bones of the foot. The podiatrist will also apply pressure to the foot or toe area to replicate the pain a person experiences when active.

If you have any questions, please contact our office located in New York, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Morton’s Neuroma