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Posts for category: Common Foot Conditions, Sports Injuries

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
October 05, 2017
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There are many different ways you can break your foot. In fact, foot and ankle fractures are among the most frequent problems confronted by podiatrists. While professional athletes may be more susceptible to a fracture due to the constant stress and physical demands of their sport, everyday exercise routines and accidents produce their fair share of broken bones. The amount and location of force applied to the bone determines how and where it will break.

Some of the different types of bone fractures that can affect the feet and ankles include:

Acute bone fractures

Usually the result of extreme force and pressure, an acute fracture involves an actual break to the bone, either partial or complete. The different types of acute fractures include:

  • Comminuted—The bone is shattered into multiple pieces.
  • Oblique—The fracture occurs on a diagonal.
  • Transverse—This is a horizontal fracture.
  • Compound—When the bone breaks through the skin, it is a compound fracture. This is often the most complicated type to treat since infections are more likely to occur.
  • Stabilized—If the ends of the bones are barely out of place, the fracture is stable and more easily treated.

Stress fractures

These are the types of cracks that can develop over a period time from the repeated stress of physical activity encountered in sports and the workplace. They can also affect people who suffer from weakened bone structure due to osteoporosis. Another frequent cause is a sudden increase in the intensity of a workout program. It is best to increase a workout regimen gradually to avoid these types of injury.

If you have suffered a fracture to your foot or ankle, it is vital to get help from a foot care specialist to ensure proper recovery. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
July 26, 2017

If you are experiencing lower calf, ankle and heel pain, especially first thing after arising, the culprit may be an inflammation of the Achilles tendon. This is the large tendon that connects your calf muscle to the back of your heel, and when it becomes overstretched or torn from excessive pressure, the result can be a painful condition called Achilles tendonitis.

What Causes Achilles Tendonitis?

Improper warm up before exercising, and having improperly treated flat feet are two possible factors. Others may include:

  • Repetitive stress—from intense sporting activities such as tennis and soccer, and from workouts that are too aggressive. Suddenly increasing the intensity or duration of a workout can also stress this tendon.
  • Starting an exercise program too rapidly—Many injuries to the Achilles tendon are caused by working out too enthusiastically after a long period of inaction. Middle aged men tend to overestimate their abilities when starting an exercise program, so always start off slowly to avoid injury.
  • Poorly fitting shoes—Shoes with proper heel and arch support are essential to maintaining foot health. Always choose an athletic shoe that is designed for the activity and that contains the adequate amount of cushioning and support.

Treatment Recommendations:

  • RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation.)—Rest your foot and use a walking boot or crutches. Ice the area for fifteen minutes whenever painful or inflamed. Wrap the area to minimize movement and to help reduce swelling. Elevate your leg on a pillow, and overnight.
  • Pain management—Ibuprofen or other pain reliever.
  • Orthotic inserts—These in combination with properly fitted shoes can relieve the strain on the tendon and cushion the heel area.
  • Physical therapy exercises—As the tendon heals, you will need to slowly strengthen and stretch the area.

If the pain in your heel is intense enough to prevent you from walking, you may have ruptured your Achilles tendon. This type of injury may need to be surgically repaired by your foot specialist.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

 

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
June 08, 2017
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This is a large tendon that connects your heel bone to your calf muscle. You may not realize it until you suffer a severe injury to this tendon, but your Achilles tendon is an essential part of your anatomy that you depend upon practically every time you move your foot. It helps you rise up on your toes when you are walking or exercising, and allows you to push off for each step. So when a sudden injury causes this tendon to tear or break, the effects are usually swift, painful and debilitating. The symptoms usually include:

 

Severe pain and swelling in the heel area

●Can’t rise up on your toes

●Can’t bend your foot down or put weight on it when you try to walk

●A snapping sound is often heard when the tendon breaks

 

Achilles tendon damage frequently occurs after a sudden increase in activity level or an increase in intensity of sporting activities, especially ones involving jumping and running. Accidents such as falling or stepping awkwardly off a curb can also stress and injure your Achilles tendon.

 

Some additional things that could increase your risk of Achilles tendon rupture include:

 

Your age—The majority of people that have this injury are between 30-40.

Steroids—The practice of injecting joints with steroids to relieve pain and inflammation can have the side effect of weakening the tendons.

Antibiotics—such as Cipro and Levaquin are implicated in an increased risk of Achilles tendon problems.

Sex—men are significantly more likely to suffer this injury.

 

If you feel your heel pop or snap and you are unable to walk normally afterward, you should seek medical care as soon as possible and make an appointment with your foot doctor for continuing evaluation and treatment.

 

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
March 17, 2017
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Stretching and tearing of the ligaments around the ankle is a very common injury that can lead to chronic complications if not treated properly from the beginning. One of the main predisposing causes of a sprained ankle is inadequate rehabilitation of a previous ankle injury. This is why it is very important to have a severely sprained ankle properly evaluated and treated by a foot specialist.

Ankle injuries can range from mild to severe, and are usually the result of the foot rolling over in an unnatural twisting motion. Mild to moderate pain and swelling and the ability to bear some weight are usually indications of an injury that can be treated at home with the RICE method—Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation.

A more severe rupture of a ligament, with noticeable instability of the ankle joint and an inability to put any weight on the foot, indicates a major problem. One of the primary indications of a major ankle injury is that there will be a great deal of pain in the beginning, quickly followed by no pain at all. The treatment for a severe sprain may require the use of splints, a cast or a boot to immobilize the ankle and allow it to heal for at least two or three weeks.

Once the initial phase of healing is complete, you will need to slowly rehabilitate the ankle using a variety of range of motion exercises, balancing, and strengthening routines. Your foot doctor can help you plan a regimen and rule out any other potential sources of foot pain, such as a hairline fracture.

The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, have extensive experience treating ankle sprains, and are experts in providing the best care for any other problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.