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By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
January 24, 2018

There are many sources of ankle pain due to the complex array of tendons, ligaments, tissues, and bones in the foot that are susceptible to painful and debilitating injury. The area of pain can radiate from the inside to the outside of the ankle, or along the Achilles tendon, where your lower leg and calf muscles connect to your heel bone.

Some of the most common ankle problems that cause pain include the following:

Even a seemingly minor ankle injury can bring on severe pain, swelling, redness, and stiffness.

Home remedies and treatment for ankle pain mainly consist of the RICE method:

  • Rest—It is very important to take the weight off of the ankle.
  • Ice—Apply an ice pack several times a day for 15-20 minutes.
  • Compression—Wrap the ankle with a compression bandage to help reduce swelling.
  • Elevation—Raising your foot above the level of your heart also reduces swelling.

Pain medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen sodium can reduce discomfort and inflammation. In cases of fractures or other major problems, surgery may be necessary.

If your pain and discomfort are not alleviated after a couple of weeks, or if the swelling remains severe after several days, it may be a sign of a more difficult problem requiring the expertise of a foot care specialist to determine the precise cause of the pain and to make the best recommendations for treatment. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
January 22, 2018
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Bunions  

You stand on your feet almost constantly throughout the day. When you were younger, your feet felt fine, but now those long hours on the bunionsjob leave you with an aching, reddened right foot. You notice a bump forming at the base of your big toe. What's happening? Your Amsterdam and Manhattan, NY, podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry help hundreds of patients just like you have the best functioning and pain-free feet. In your case, Dr. Sorelis Jimenz, Dr. John Fletcher, or Dr. Kamilla Danilova may diagnose and treat a deformity called a bunion. Learn the details here.

The symptoms of bunions

A bunion forms on the inner aspect of the foot at the bottom of the big toe as the metatarsophalangeal joint begins to bulge outward. This happens in response to pressure from standing, running or walking for extended periods or from shoes that are too tight and too high. Heredity, injury and flat arches contribute to bunion formation, too.

Besides the obvious bump, bunions exhibit other symptoms, says the American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons. Typically, bunions cause:

  • Pain when standing or ambulating
  • Inflammation
  • A burning or numb feeling
  • Redness and swelling

Additionally, other complications arise when people ignore their bunions--common deformities such as hammertoes and hallux valgus, where the big toe turns inward toward, and even over, the second and third toes.

Who gets bunions?

Millions of Americans do, particularly in the over 50 age group. Also, the American Podiatric Medical Association says that many more women than men have this foot problem because women's connective tissue is weaker than in their male counterparts and because of poorly fitting shoes. Footwear that is too tight in the toe box or too high in the heel (greater than 2 inches) puts excessive pressure on all the toes, and especially on the big toe.

Treating bunions

Your podiatrist in Amsterdam and Manhattan diagnoses bunions through review of symptoms, physical examination and X-ray imaging. As bunionectomy surgery is usually  a last  resort, the foot doctor likely will recommend an individualized care plan including these conservative measures:

  • Custom-made orthotics (shoe inserts)
  • Shoe padding
  • Anti-inflammatory medications
  • Rest, ice and elevation of the foot
  • Night time splinting to straighten the joint
  • Cortisone injections
  • Stretching exercises or other physical therapy

Have healthy feet

Contact the office team at Foot Health Podiatry for a consultation if you suspect you have a bunion. Don't wait. Call your Amsterdam and Manhattan, NY,  podiatrist

 at (212) 864-2494.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
January 16, 2018
Category: Proper Footwear
Tags: Bunions   plantar fasciitis  

More women are choosing to forego the wearing of high heeled shoes as sales of the constricting and uncomfortable footwear continue a fast decline in favor of flats and other comfort wear. The trend is being fueled by high profile celebrities like Oprah Winfrey who have decided they don’t want to sacrifice their health in pursuit of dubious high fashion. While some women continue to wear heels at work or for special occasions, the major shift in the workplace is to more comfortable shoes and clothing.

Forcing your feet into high heels on a regular basis exacerbates a long list of foot and ankle problems, including:

  • Plantar fasciitis—An inflammation of the band of tissue that runs across the foot bottom
  • Ankle injuries—Ankle pain and increased stiffness due to decreased mobility
  • Foot deformities and skin conditions—Corns, calluses, bunions, and hammertoes are more likely to occur in frequent wearers of high heels.
  • Neuromas—Morton’s neuroma is caused by the increased pressure on the ball of the foot
  • Achilles tendon issues—Shortening and stiffening of the Achilles tendon, which often can cause difficulties when you try wearing flats again

High heels also have the effect of putting the knees in a permanently bent position, causing excess stress to the knee joints and interrupting the natural movement of the foot, which has a concomitant effect on walking mechanics. Additionally, the spine can become misaligned increasing the compression forces on vertebrae in the lower back. The resultant need to overuse the back muscles also adds to this layering of pain and discomfort. Medical professionals also believe that women who often wear high heels are more likely to develop osteoarthritis as they get older.

If you are experiencing foot problems caused by the wearing of high heels, your foot doctor can help. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

 

Peroneal tendonitis is a rather uncommon injury that can cause considerable pain on the outside of the foot and possibly along the outer area of the lower leg. Since this malady can be misdiagnosed by general doctors as plantar fasciitis, it is very important to see a foot care specialist to receive the correct diagnosis and care.

There are two peroneal ligaments, the peroneus longus and the peroneus brevis which form parallel to each other on the outside of the foot. These eventually join with the corresponding muscles of the lower leg. These two tendons work concomitantly to roll your foot outwards and they also assist your calf muscles in flexing the plantar fascia, which runs along the bottom of your foot. These tendons also add to ankle stability during weight-bearing exercises.

The symptoms of peroneal tendonitis include:

  • Tenderness and pain along one or both tendons on the outside of the foot
  • Pain while doing exercises such as running
  • Soreness and stiffness when you roll your foot outwards or during passive stretching

Although you may be feeling extreme pain from this injury, peroneal tendonitis generally responds very well to physical therapy and home treatments, with surgery rarely being required.

Treatment options may include the following:

  • Rest for the affected foot
  • Stretching of the calf muscles
  • Strengthening and flexibility exercises
  • Balancing exercises
  • Icing and contrast baths
  • Ultrasound
  • Whirlpool and paraffin baths
  • Custom fitted orthotic shoe inserts

Should your tendons not favorably respond to rest and physical therapy exercises after a few weeks, an orthotic insert may be needed. The use of standard over-the-counter inserts is not recommended for this particular injury since they shift the stress to the outside of the foot, in the area of the sore tendons.

An X-ray will be taken of the foot and your doctor may recommend an MRI to rule out any major problems such as severe tendon damage. A custom orthopedic shoe insert can then be used with the emphasis being to shift the stress away from the injured tendons.

For peroneal tendonitis or any other problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles, the podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
January 03, 2018
Category: Foot Conditions

Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a condition that is similar to the wrist condition called carpal tunnel syndrome, with which many people are familiar, except the tarsal tunnel is located near the ankle bones where thick ligament tissue encloses the nerves, tendons, arteries, and veins that supply the foot. When this tissue becomes constricted or compressed, the resulting pressure on the posterior tibial nerve causes pain, numbness, or a burning sensation that is felt on the bottom of the foot or on the inward side of the ankle and it may come on suddenly.

Causes of tarsal tunnel syndrome

Injuries such as ankle sprains and strains that occur near the tunnel can cause inflammation that compresses the nerve. People who have flat feet and are subject to an outward rolling of the foot are more susceptible to strain and compression of the tarsal tunnel. Systemic diseases such as inflammatory arthritis and diabetes can also contribute to nerve compression problems. There is also the possibility that an obstruction is pressing on the nerve inside the tunnel. This could be from a swollen tendon, ganglion cyst, or varicose vein, among other possibilities.

Diagnosing and treating tarsal tunnel syndrome

Your foot doctor will make an assessment regarding your loss of feeling and burning sensations, and it may be necessary to perform advanced imaging studies to confirm that the loss of feeling isn’t caused by a growth inside the tunnel.

Conservative treatments may include:

  • Resting and icing the foot to reduce inflammation and promote healing.
  • Taking ibuprofen to relieve pain and swelling.
  • Immobilizing the foot with a cast or boot to allow the nerve and tissues to heal.
  • Physical therapy.
  • Ultrasound treatments are often effective.
  • Custom fitted orthotic inserts and supportive shoes can provide arch support and decrease movements that may contribute to nerve compression.
  • A foot brace may be required to redistribute pressure.

Surgery may be necessary in severe cases and, left untreated, tarsal tunnel syndrome can cause permanent damage, so be sure to consult with your foot care professional. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

 





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