Clinica de los Pies
2256 Second Ave New York, NY 10029
Tel: (212) 845-9991 | Fax: (212) 864-2494

Foot Health Podiatry
1080 Amsterdam Avenue, Suite 101
Amsterdam, NY 10025

Tel: (212) 845-9991 | Fax: (212) 864-2494

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By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
September 21, 2017
Tags: blister  

Developing a blister can sure take the fun out of an otherwise enjoyable physical activity. The combination of heat, moisture, and rubbing that occurs during running, hiking, and other activities can cause these fluid filled bubbles to form, often resulting in pain, redness, and possible infection.

Some tips to help prevent blisters include the following:

  • Treat hot spots—Often the best way to prevent a blister from forming is to make sure that any areas of the skin that are susceptible to excessive rubbing are protected. By covering the spot with tape, liquid bandage, moleskin, or other shoe inserts, you can decrease the friction and avoid the blistering. If you notice an irritation developing during an activity, apply the same measures.
  • Proper hydration—When you dehydrate, it can cause your feet to become swollen which consequently increases friction and rubbing in your footwear causing blisters to occur. Drink plenty of healthy fluids before, during, and after exercise to maintain good hydration.
  • If the shoe fits—Poorly fitting shoes can also be a major cause of blisters. Shoes that are too tight or too loose can both lead to friction and pressure that causes blisters to develop. Always wear a shoe that is properly fitted and appropriate for the activity.

If you do develop a blister, it is important to resist the urge to pop it. The blister will heal better if left intact. If your blister pops and subsequently becomes infected, you should consult with a foot care specialist for proper treatment. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
September 19, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: heel pain  

Has your heel suddenly started hurting and you don't know why? Our Manhattan and Amsterdam, NY, podiatrists - Dr. Sorelis Jimenez, Dr. heel painJohn Fletcher and Dr. Kamilla Danilova - discuss common causes of heel pain and explain treatment options that will help you get back on your feet.

Your exercise routine

Exercising regularly is an excellent way to stay in shape and improve your health, but it's not without risks. If you haven't exercised for a while and push yourself too hard, you can injure your heels and feet. Pain can also occur if you decide to increase the length or intensity of your usual exercise routine. Overuse injuries can cause plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the band of connective tissue that runs underneath your feet or other inflammatory conditions, including retrocalcaneal bursitis and Achilles tendinitis.

Your job

Teachers, nurses, factory workers, retail clerks and other people who rarely get the chance to sit down during the workday are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis. The condition causes heel pain that's worse in the morning and increases if you've been on your feet for a long time.

Your age

Although your feet may look exactly the same as they did when you were younger, aging also affects them. You're more likely to develop plantar fasciitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, Achilles tendinitis or arthritis the older you get.

The shoes you wear

Your running shoes may look perfectly fine after months of use, but appearances can be deceiving. Over time, the material in the sole can compress. When that happens, the shoes no longer cushion and support your foot effectively, putting you at risk for developing common heel conditions.

Your gait

Gait issues can increase your risk of heel pain. For example, if your feet roll inward when you walk, you may be more likely to develop plantar fasciitis. Gait issues may also be responsible for painful plantar calluses on the bottom of your heel.

What can I do about heel pain?

Often rest, ice, over-the-counter pain medications and a new pair of shoes can help relieve heel pain. If your symptoms don't improve, it's a good idea to pay a visit to our Manhattan or Amsterdam office. Treatments vary depending on the cause of your pain. Gait issues can often be improved with orthotics, prescription shoe inserts that hold your feet in the optimum position. If your plantar fasciitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis or Achilles tendinitis pain is severe, corticosteroid injections can be helpful. Other treatment options may include boots or walking casts, night splints, physical therapy, ultrasound therapy or even surgery, in some cases.

Don't let heel pain take over your life. Call our Manhattan and Amsterdam, NY, podiatrists - Dr. Jimenez, Dr. Fletcher and Dr. Danilova - at (212) 845-9991 to make an appointment.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
September 14, 2017
Tags: Untagged

The plantar fascia is a large area of connective tissue that starts at the heel bone and runs along the bottom of your foot, through your arch, and ends at your toes. Since it supports your arch and provides significant shock absorption, the plantar fascia is particularly susceptible to injury from the repetitive stress experienced by runners, other athletes, and those who spend a lot of time on their feet every day for work.

Symptoms of plantar fasciitis:

Heel pain—One of the most common symptoms of plantar fasciitis is a pain in the heel. This can either be a sharp, stabbing sensation or dull and achy. It is usually most prevalent upon first applying weight to your foot in the morning. This discomfort and pain is likely to get worse without treatment, leading to other problems with your feet, legs, hips and back.

Bottom of the foot pain and discomfort—Pain and burning in the tissue along the bottom of the foot. The pain can get worse when climbing stairs or standing on your toes.

Exercise and occupational pain—Heel and arch pain that improves with the beginning of activity but returns at the end of activity.

Plantar fasciitis may sometimes be mistaken for or exacerbated by other conditions that have similar symptoms including arthritis and nerve problems like tarsal tunnel syndrome. Continued stress on the plantar fascia may result in the formation of a heel spur at the connection to the heel bone.

Due to the possible complications and ramifications of improper diagnosis and treatment for plantar fasciitis, it is important to see a foot care specialist for the correct care. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

 

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
September 08, 2017
Category: Proper Foot Care
Tags: Untagged

While doing a warm up routine before exercising or playing sports, some people tend to give their feet and ankles short shrift, when in fact you should be paying particular attention to them since they form your foundation and require proper stretching to help prevent injuries.

 

Some excellent foot and ankle exercises that you can do almost anywhere include:

 

Arch stretching—While in a seated position with one leg crossed over the knee of the other leg, pull your toes backward and feel a good stretch in the arch of the foot. Hold this stretch for thirty seconds and repeat with other foot. Another arch exercise consists of rolling a frozen water bottle or tennis ball under the arch for a minute or two.

 

Toe stretching—While seated, stretch your toes back and forth, holding in between for five or ten seconds. Repeat this ten times. Another good toe exercise is to pick up marbles with your toes one at a time and drop them in a cup.

 

Calf stretching—While supporting yourself standing on the edge of a step, raise and lower your heels back and forth slowly. Hold for ten seconds at the top and ten seconds at the bottom. Repeat ten times. You can also try sitting with your legs outstretched and wrap a towel around your toes. Pull back on the ends of the towel with your arms and hold the stretch for thirty seconds. Repeat with the other foot.

 

Even with regular stretching and balancing exercises, injuries and accidents will still occur. The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC, in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or to make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

By Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC
August 31, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

One often hears about physical therapy being used to aid in recovery from an injury or surgery. But physical therapy can also be used to alleviate the discomfort and pain of a variety of conditions and also to help prevent injuries from occurring in the first place. Physical therapy can help in the treatment of a variety of ailments including arthritis, bunions, flat feet, peroneal tendonitis, and chronic ankle pain and instability.

 

Benefits of Physical Therapy

 

Some of the advantages of physical therapy include:

 

  • Avoiding surgery—A well planned regimen of physical therapy can often avoid the need for surgery and a long recovery.
  • Pain maintenance—A variety of techniques can be used to decrease pain and discomfort.
  • Increase strength and flexibility—Exercises to slowly increase the strength and flexibility of muscles and tendons can help you get back on your feet after surgery, or help to avoid a repeat injury.
  • Fall prevention—Balance problems lead to a large number of falls every year. Some of these can be prevented through physical therapy exercises that increase ankle strength and mobility.

 

Some of the therapies and treatments you can discuss with your doctor include: Hot and cold compresses, physical manipulation, stretching, taping, electrical stimulation of muscles, ultrasound, and high frequency current therapy to jumpstart the healing process.

 

A physical therapy program can be created with your specific needs in mind, and your foot doctor can help design and implement the plan that is right for you.  The podiatrists at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC in New York City, NY, are experts in providing the best care for any problems you may be experiencing with your feet and ankles. Sorelis Jimenez, DPM, John W. Fletcher, DPM, and Kamilla Danilova, DPM and the rest of the staff at Foot Health Podiatry, PLLC are happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out our Ask The Doctor page for answers to frequently asked questions, and never hesitate to give us a call to talk or make an appointment at 212-845-9991.

 





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